GRANT #459:

Lamoille Art & Justice Project

07/19/2021
How Can You Attract A Diverse Population When Your State Is 94% White?

If the State of Vermont is predominantly white (over 94%), Lamoille County is even whiter (nearly 96%). You can understand why it’s a challenge to keep the younger generations of Black, Brown, Asian, and multi-racial Vermonters from moving to a state with a more diverse population. That’s why The Lamoille Art & Justice Project is calling to them, and their elders, through public art projects and oral histories that boldly proclaim the proud presence of generations of PGM Vermont citizens. (They prefer “People of the Global Majority which includes Indigenous, Black, Brown, Asian and other non-white people.)

Because the makeup of communities is changing, the LA&JP wants to make sure everybody’s talking about the systems that need to change, too, such as governing bodies, businesses, and schools.

Here’s the plan: professional muralists have designed a colorful artwork to be painted by local volunteers. A QR code painted into the mural will link to a website, where podcasts, photos, and other media resources will be available for ongoing learning. It’s bringing together local artists, educators, students, allies, and organizations, all working to advance racial equity.

Our Awesome Without Borders grant will help with the costs of producing and installing a 20-foot mural at the Stowe Recreation Path, a popular destination for locals and visitors, gateway to historic Stowe village. The mural will be painted directly on the path and will be maintained for three years. Bikers, walkers, and joggers will be immersed in the artwork and the stories it tells.

Structural inequities hold the economy down, hurt the educational system, and create a steady drain of talent.

The Lamoille Art & Justice Project aims to create opportunities for honest and creative conversations about ways their rural communities can respond, grow and revitalize post-pandemic and beyond.

Curious? Check it out.